Semiocast Study – Asia as a New Emerging Region for Twitter

 

Twitter, the micro-blogging service, continues to drag the hearts and minds of Asians.

When Twitter was launched 3 years ago, it usally attracted responses from celebrities in Asia who were accused of capitalizing on the features to drum up support and a greater fan base.

Now the horizon is way more expanding. Not only the younger trend-setters, but the older opinion leaders (e.g. CEOs from South Korea, politicians from Japan and monks from India) are also brisky contributing to the Twitter world.  

Despite Twitter started from English service, people continue to see exciting growth from Asia via multilngual services. For example, lawmaker Kenzo Fujisue now tweets – all in Japanese – daily-basis to his 5,500 followers. CEO of Hyundai Mongjun Jeon first heard about Twitter from his communicadtion advisor and recently started to tweet in Korean.

And here is the interesting study. According to Semiocast, the Paris-based social media measurement company, Asia is now the first and fastest growing Twitter region.

*Followed by the UN’s statistic division’s classification.The figures is broken down by 6 regions: Asia, North America, South America, Europe, Africa and Oceania.

The company conducted a 24-hour study on about 2.9 million tweets in June 22nd 2010 to find that the most traffic originated from Asia, not North America. In case of the U.S., it now only accounts for 25% of tweets, drastically down from 30% in March 2010.

As the first Asian Twitter nation, Japan ranked the second highest with 18% of tweets worldwide. South Korea ranked seventh in terms of tweeting despite its relatively small number of population.  These figures prove Twitter’s sustained popularity in Asia. 

Since Twitter is considered the idealest social media tool to connect people, more and more Asian communities from everywhere want to use it for their success. As the U.S. is no longer the hero in Twitter world, the more resources are necessary to improve global social media. With careful research and detailed measurement in the non-US nations, we should find out how to communicate with them.

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About jiyoonchoi

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One Response to Semiocast Study – Asia as a New Emerging Region for Twitter

  1. Noelle Perez says:

    It is absolutely no surprise to me that Asia is the fastest growing Twitter region. I grew up in the Philippines, but moved to NY when I was 21. Back then, I was on Friendster in order to get in touch with friends and loved ones back home. It’s interesting to note what sort of changes has happened since then – from uploading photos, music, and making changes to your profile. On Friendster, you didn’t have a status comment box to write on. In order to make people take notice of your profile, you keep on uploading photos or changing your profile picture. You also had to redo your profile info as to what TV shows you were watching religiously or not. Then years after, Twitter comes along with the ability to do a “shout-out” to your friends and contacts.

    Asian countries have always been first on anything related to technology – from cool cellphone gears and gadgets to text messaging ability. Twitter or any other social media should just fit into the mix. We are looking forward to being part of the revolution called social media because we have above average skills on this type of things. Our knowledge of computer and emerging technology is not basic at all.

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